• Allyson Koekhoven

A writer is a writer. Or are they?

There is a general assumption (exclude most writers and content creators here) that if you can write a story, you can then write business content. And vice versa. Oh, that it was so.

I've been a business to business (trace and technical) content creator for almost four decades, but it certainly didn't equip me to write novels.

I would like to believe that I have the rules of engagement down to a 'T' with regard to my chosen occupation, but most of those rules are of no importance to writing fiction works that people might want to read for pleasure. Let's be honest, if I was to write "Xanthe couldn't contain her excitement as she spied the touchless biometrics solution which had been designed to seamlessly integrate into a wide variety of access control environments....", would that push all the right buttons for you?

So how did I manage the transition between business writing and creative writing? There is no simple answer but for starters, the desire to download the book idea from my brain to paper was essential. I realised early in the process that I couldn’t do this alone, so I attended several novel writing classes and I invested, quite heavily, in many books on the art of writing. I read them cover to cover, repeatedly, and made extensive notes on sticky notes.

The final key to moving relatively seamlessly between the two writing worlds was to purge my brain of anything I had written for clients during the day, before delving into the world of Adine and her bookmates.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to go finish writing an article on end-to-end communication and monitoring solutions for the mining sector.


Coming next....Part 3: Precious little time


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